Find the Perfect Size Glasses for Your Face

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Unlike shoe sizes or clothing sizes, frame sizes are not as simple and straight forward. Frame measurements are helpful in finding a good fit but there are a few tricks to understanding them and making use of them. Here we break down the numbers:

Frame width: Frame width is the most important factor in finding the right frames that fit you well. As a general rule, your eyes should be nearly centered in the width of the lenses. A frame which is too wide will make your eyes look close set while a frame which is too narrow will make your face look wider. The first number of a frame measurement (50-19-140) is the width of one of the lenses, measured in millimetres. This number will give you an idea of the frame’s overall width).
Narrow: If you have a narrow face, look for frames between 42mm to 50mm range.
Medium: Medium faces can range from 48mm to 53mm
Wide: Wider faces should look for frame widths of 52mm and higher

Bridge width and location: Consider the location of the bridge in relation to the browline of the frame. Bridges which are even with the browline of the frame are good if the bridge of your nose is higher on your face, frames with a lower bridge and an arched browline are better if the bridge of your nose is lower on your face. The bridge width is the second number of a frame measurement (50-19-140) and is also a factor to consider. This measurement is taken from the distance between the lenses.
Narrow bridge: If you have a narrow bridge or close set eyes you will want this number to be lower (15mm to 18mm).
Wider bridge: If you have a wider bridge or wide set eyes you will want this number to be higher (18mm to 22mm).

Temple length: If you have had problems with temples being too short, look for frames with lengths of 145mm and 150mm The third number of a frame measurement (50-19-140) is the temple length (the length of the ‘arm’). This measurement varies less than the others with 135mm, 140mm, 145mm and 150mm being the most common.

2 Comments

  • Joe

    An invaluable and helpful article! Thank you.

    • Read Optics

      Thank you for your comments. We will be posting more informative articles soon.